SALES BEYOND THE BOOTH

SALES BEYOND THE BOOTH

SALES BEYOND THE BOOTH

Get your FREE pre, during & post-show

checklist, NOW!

Form

When you plan accordingly, the impact of a tradeshow can have exponential returns.

It is one thing to build a booth, send out some marketing materials and hope to grab some good leads at the show, but that won’t give you the return you want. You’ll need to do more. Part of the marketing plan should go beyond the show floor. 

Here are 4 ways you can land sales beyond the booth:

Hit social media HARD.

Designate one person for social media and have them hit it hard. This will ensure consistent and clear messaging is communicated. This activity needs to start before the show, happen during the show and then continue post show. Use the same message across Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, etc.

Make sure that whomever is designated as your social media expert knows what they are doing! Have all messages approved by marketing or a sales manager before they go out. You don’t want the wrong message, a bad link, or typos going across the social media channels.

Push the PR (Public Relations).

Contact the show and find out who their media outlets are. From there, promote your new product or service to these groups with a well-written, professional press release. Media outlets need content, so give them something to write about and make it exciting. If you don’t have a new product or service, then talk about a problem you have been solving for years and how you can help those coming to the show.

When writing news releases, keep in mind: SO WHAT? Why is this important to the reader? How does it benefit them or make some sort of difference to the community?

Request an interview.

The show promoter will be doing a video to publicize how awesome the show was and how everyone should attend and exhibit next year. Give you and your company a free plug – offer to give an interview saying how amazing and valuable the show is. It’s another way to get your name in front of the masses. Once you’re part of the video, make sure to send the video link out to your contacts via email, put it on your website and send in your social media campaigns. You’ll look like a vital part of the show and in case they missed you, your prospects will get another look at your company.

Volunteer to speak as an industry expert.

Most shows have education tracks that attract attendees – be one of the speakers. The trick here is to genuinely fill a need for the industry rather than pushing out product. You will gain a solid reputation for solving needs versus promoting yourself. This again will show your prospects and current customers that you are indeed a leader in the industry and the right choice in a business partner.

It takes over 12 touch points to gain someone’s attention. Between the outlets above, your booth, the sales team, and marketing, you can get to those 12 touch points quite easily. People will start to connect the dots and remember you when they see your name in various places. These tactics after the tradeshow will most certainly impact the success of the show.

DEB VENABLE
Executive Coach

Deb Venable has over 25 years of experience in the tradeshow industry. As a seasoned entrepreneur and business owner, Deb understands first-hand the struggles and obstacles of growing a business and exhibiting.  A leader in sales strategy and coaching, Deb’s passion for people and progress help her work with business owners to generate significant, predictable & sustainable growth year after year.

MYB2BCOACH is designed to leverage the combined knowledge of your business leadership and transform it into practical skills that become second nature to your sales team. Our proven process is built on strategy, training, accountability, and A.I. sales coaching software. Your sales team will become confident, comfortable and conversational in their prospecting and closing, leading to new clients, improved profits, increased commissions, and job satisfaction.

SHOULD NON-SALESPEOPLE WORK THE BOOTH?

SHOULD NON-SALESPEOPLE WORK THE BOOTH?

SHOULD NON-SALESPEOPLE WORK THE BOOTH?

Get your FREE pre, during & post-show

checklist, NOW!

Form

It happens all the time – engineers, technicians, developers, and marketers are sent to the tradeshow to set up the booth, product and technology. They are the brains behind making the booth come together and hum with excitement.

Since the money has already been spent to send them to the show, it makes sense to have them just stay and work the booth during showtime too, right? Well, it depends.

A successful show starts with the flawless execution of an eye-catching booth where the product, machinery, technology, demos, etc. are all functioning without a hitch. But come show time, who in your driven, prepared team is ready to talk to clients? Who in the crew will go out of their way to encourage people to enter the booth and talk?

The ideal team to work a booth is your sales team. They have spent countless hours in training, prospecting, meeting with clients, and closing sales. This is where they thrive – in face-to-face situations where they can shake a client’s hand and make a lasting impression. However, exhibiting can be expensive and often budget constraints prevent the full sales team from attending a show. The budget is split between sales, marketing and the tech group.  All groups that are critical to a successful show.

So, what is the answer?

Make the time to educate, train and prepare non-salespeople how to work a show. Often the engineers and tech team know more about the actual product than sales so they can be a huge asset. Equip them with a few sales tactics and you could have a dynamic team on the show floor.

Here’s how you can help your non-salespeople work the booth:

  • PREPARE THEM

    • Know the show schedule

    • Study the flow of attendees and where to stand in the booth

    • Set goals for the show – quality or quantity

    • Assign responsibility of those working the show

    • Define and practice the lead collection process

  • LOOK LIKE SALES STAFF

    • Dress appropriately and make sure your name tag is visible

    • DO NOT use your phone during show hours

    • DO NOT eat during show hours

    • Make eye contact and smile

  • PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE

    • Role play weeks before the show

    • Role play right before the show opens – in your booth if possible

    • Recap at the end of every day to see what is working and what isn’t

Non-salespeople who attend a show can be a huge asset when you prepare and train them to be an extension of your sales and marketing team. Don’t take for granted their knowledge for the product or service and assume they know how to sell. They also want to be part of the success. Who knows, maybe your next best salesperson will emerge!

DEB VENABLE
Executive Coach

Deb Venable has over 25 years of experience in the tradeshow industry. As a seasoned entrepreneur and business owner, Deb understands first-hand the struggles and obstacles of growing a business and exhibiting.  A leader in sales strategy and coaching, Deb’s passion for people and progress help her work with business owners to generate significant, predictable & sustainable growth year after year.

MYB2BCOACH is designed to leverage the combined knowledge of your business leadership and transform it into practical skills that become second nature to your sales team. Our proven process is built on strategy, training, accountability, and A.I. sales coaching software. Your sales team will become confident, comfortable and conversational in their prospecting and closing, leading to new clients, improved profits, increased commissions, and job satisfaction.

5 BEST QUESTIONS FOR GETTING SOMEONE INTO YOUR BOOTH

5 BEST QUESTIONS FOR GETTING SOMEONE INTO YOUR BOOTH

5 BEST QUESTIONS FOR GETTING SOMEONE INTO YOUR BOOTH

Get your FREE pre, during & post-show

checklist, NOW!

Form

You’re at the show, looking sharp, and ready to help people with your product and service. The attendees begin filing in. They came to the show looking for answers but as soon as they enter the show hall, they feel like little lambs receiving stares from hungry wolves. They begin to feel intimidated and will begin use tactics to avoid making eye contact with you. But, that’s okay because it’s to be expected.

Here are subtle, polite ways around this:

First, don’t fall into the trap of everyday questions (and responses).

  • For example: How are you? (Fine), What brings you to the show? (Just looking), Can I borrow a few minutes to tell you what we do? (No)

  • These questions along with many others will get you nowhere. It’s important to never ask a close-ended question.

Second, prepare your questions.

  • Prior to the show, your team should meet to discuss the strategy for attending the show.

  • Who are your target prospects?

  • Is the goal the number of leads, the number of demos, or the number of actual sales?

  • What does a successful show look like.

 Creative and scripted questions should be formed ahead of time so you will stand out and attract attendees to your booth.

Below are the 5 best questions for getting someone in your booth. These are questions that I have used or have been used on me that will get the conversation started.

 

1. How have you been?

If you must default to this “safe” ice breaker then ask it the right way. “How are you?” asks how someone is at that moment. “How have you been?” is a question a friend would ask that has known you for awhile. You’re asking about the past even though you have no history with the person. It’s emits a pause from many.

 

2. What can I specifically help you find today at the show? If I can’t offer it, maybe I can help direct you to another vendor?

They are at the show for a reason but before they can shut you down, you’ve offered to help them, regardless if it benefits you or not. This shows some humility and makes them feel safer.

 

3. (Their name), tell me what you’re working on back at the office and what at this show could help you?

Often using their name casually helps break the ice and helps them realize you’re here to personally help them.

 

4. These shows can be overwhelming, what’s the one goal you want to accomplish while here?

Acknowledging the obvious breaks down their guard to be more open with you.

 

5. What’s your biggest struggle you’re trying to overcome at work?

Sometimes they will laugh and give you an answer that has nothing to do with the show. That’s okay though, share the chuckle and ask again what you can do to help them.

 

You will get those attendees that will not budge and make a connection with you. Tradeshows are an extension of sales, and sales is a numbers game – keep getting the “no’s” and eventually you’ll get the yes.

 

The beauty behind these 5 questions is that you’ve left an impression on that attendee that the show is about them, not you. This feeling will make you more memorable, and maybe when they pass by you for the 10th time, your smile and welcoming approach will finally bend them to talk.

DEB VENABLE
Executive Coach

Deb Venable has over 25 years of experience in the tradeshow industry. As a seasoned entrepreneur and business owner, Deb understands first-hand the struggles and obstacles of growing a business and exhibiting.  A leader in sales strategy and coaching, Deb’s passion for people and progress help her work with business owners to generate significant, predictable & sustainable growth year after year.

MYB2BCOACH is designed to leverage the combined knowledge of your business leadership and transform it into practical skills that become second nature to your sales team. Our proven process is built on strategy, training, accountability, and A.I. sales coaching software. Your sales team will become confident, comfortable and conversational in their prospecting and closing, leading to new clients, improved profits, increased commissions, and job satisfaction.

PART 3: THE POST-SHOW

PART 3: THE POST-SHOW

THE ROLE OF SALES AT A TRADESHOW BOOTH
PART 3: THE POST-SHOW

Get your FREE pre, during & post-show

checklist, NOW!

Form

Here is the final part of my 3-part miniseries, “The Role of Sales at a Tradeshow Booth”.

PART 3: THE POST-SHOW – FOLLOW THROUGH.

Notice, I did not say follow-up. You’ve already put so much energy and effort into the show so now it’s time to follow through on all your promises and connections. The leads collected at the show are gold – not only are they qualified because you or a colleague had spoken to them, but they are also giving you an open invitation to connect with them.

Below are 5 tips to guide you as you follow through with your new leads.

1. CALL THEM

DON’T hide behind an email or a mass/generic mailer from your marketing department. You’re exhausted from the show, and so are they, but that should not stop you from simply leaving a message to say, “Hey, after we’ve both caught up from the show, let’s connect!” Make sure your name is the most repeated name they hear so it will not be forgotten.

2. FOLLOW-UP

Here is where you follow-up with what they specifically requested. Mail them the product sample, email them a video link or set up that demo. This is your soft entrance because they gave you permission to reach out to them…so make sure to take advantage of it!

3. MAKE IT PERSONAL

Make sure they feel this is coming from YOU – the one they spoke to on the show floor. Reference those special notes taken on the show floor and keep the relationship going. Mass emails will get deleted.

4. DON’T GIVE UP

Sales cycles will vary so it may take up to a year for a lead to actually convert. The trick here is consistent touch points until you can follow through with either selling your product or service, or for you to take the polite no and move on. Either way, don’t give up until you have one or the other.

5. TELL MARKETING

Close to 70% of trade show leads are abandoned according to marketers. Often this is because the lead gets lost in the sales cycle and there is lack of communication back to marketing. Marketing needs to justify going to trade shows. The more times the sales team communicates their specific results, the better chance you have for the company to keep investing in tradeshows.

Trade shows can be a lucrative and positive way to grow sales. Like anything else in sales, it takes strategy, practice and diligence to be successful. By working together, marketing and sales can ensure a healthy return on their time and money.

 

In case you missed it….

Part 1. THE ROLE OF SALES AT A TRADESHOW BOOTH: THE PRE-SHOW, click here to read it now!

Part 2. THE ROLE OF SALES AT A TRADESHOW BOOTH: THE SHOW, click here to read it now!

 

Next week, I’ll give you 5 of the best questions to get someone into your booth! You won’t want to miss this great information!

DEB VENABLE
Executive Coach

Deb Venable has over 25 years of experience in the tradeshow industry. As a seasoned entrepreneur and business owner, Deb understands first-hand the struggles and obstacles of growing a business and exhibiting.  A leader in sales strategy and coaching, Deb’s passion for people and progress help her work with business owners to generate significant, predictable & sustainable growth year after year.

MYB2BCOACH is designed to leverage the combined knowledge of your business leadership and transform it into practical skills that become second nature to your sales team. Our proven process is built on strategy, training, accountability, and A.I. sales coaching software. Your sales team will become confident, comfortable and conversational in their prospecting and closing, leading to new clients, improved profits, increased commissions, and job satisfaction.

PART 2: THE SHOW

PART 2: THE SHOW

THE ROLE OF SALES AT A TRADESHOW BOOTH
PART 2: THE SHOW

Get your FREE pre, during & post-show

checklist, NOW!

Form

Here is part 2 of my 3-part miniseries, “The Role of Sales at a Tradeshow Booth”.

PART 2: THE SHOW – BE READY.

Show time is game time. After 25 years in the tradeshow industry, I have seen the best exhibit designs diminished by a lackadaisical, uneducated booth staff. Don’t do this! You’re in sales, work your magic. The number one goal is to get qualified prospects into your booth.

Here are 4 ways to crush that goal:

1. KNOW THE AUDIENCE

As the masses walk up and down the aisle, know what badges to look for. They are often color coded by media, exhibitor, buyer, etc. If so, target the ones who are potential buyers. If not, you will need to ask the right questions to determine who they are.

2. KNOW YOUR BOOTH

Get to the booth early to thoroughly understand the messaging, product placement, how to work any demos, and the general flow of the booth. This is your company, make sure you are an extension of the company and the booth’s message.  

3. ASK OPEN ENDED QUESTIONS

“Good morning,” and “How are you today?” will only get you a polite nod and a fast-walker. Ask what brings them to the show or invite them in for a demo. Ask about the opening speaker or inquire about what seminars they are attending. In exchange for 5 minutes of their time, offer them an amazing giveaway!

4. ADD NOTES TO LEADS

After you have engaged with a client or prospect, jot down notes from the interaction. This could be product or service related as well as a personal tidbit you picked up on (sports, kids, pets, etc.) Working a show is tiring and fast paced, but by simply adding a note to the lead collector or even a notebook, the follow up call after the show will be much easier and more personal. Those little details you noted will make the client or prospect feel remembered.

If you missed Part 1 and want to know THE ROLE OF SALES AT A TRADESHOW BOOTH: THE PRE-SHOW, click here to read it now! Make sure to check back next week for part 3 where I tell you the roles of sales after the show.

DEB VENABLE
Executive Coach

Deb Venable has over 25 years of experience in the tradeshow industry. As a seasoned entrepreneur and business owner, Deb understands first-hand the struggles and obstacles of growing a business and exhibiting.  A leader in sales strategy and coaching, Deb’s passion for people and progress help her work with business owners to generate significant, predictable & sustainable growth year after year.

MYB2BCOACH is designed to leverage the combined knowledge of your business leadership and transform it into practical skills that become second nature to your sales team. Our proven process is built on strategy, training, accountability, and A.I. sales coaching software. Your sales team will become confident, comfortable and conversational in their prospecting and closing, leading to new clients, improved profits, increased commissions, and job satisfaction.

PART 1: THE PRE-SHOW

PART 1: THE PRE-SHOW

THE ROLE OF SALES AT A TRADESHOW BOOTH
PART 1: THE PRE-SHOW

Get your FREE pre, during & post-show

checklist, NOW!

Form

It is ESSENTIAL that sales and marketing work hand-in-hand to ensure a successful return on the trade show. With over 30% of a company’s marketing budget spent on exhibiting at a trade show, the ROI must be there.  

So, what are the responsibilities of the sales team at the show? Let’s be clear that the investment made into a tradeshow is an investment made into sales. You are attending the show to launch a new product, educate customers, or source new prospects – all of which results in increased sales. Tradeshows may be one of the biggest investments the company is making so it’s important for your sales staff to make the best of it.

Here is part 1 of my 3-part miniseries, “The Role of Sales at a Tradeshow Booth”.

PART 1: THE PRE-SHOW – BE PROACTIVE.

This is not Field of Dreams where “build it and they will come”.  A lot of hard work must be put into the show three months before the show opens. The pre-show is to set appointments with customers and prospects.

Here are 3 things the sales team needs to do before the show:

1. START MARKETING

The marketing department should start sending out pre-show mailers and emails to announce the show, but as a salesperson, you will need to start marketing, too. Spread the word by posting on your social media. Let your followers know when and where the show is, share company updates about the show to your profile, inform them on what’s new at the show, and build excitement by telling them of any giveaways they could win or free swag they can pick up. Don’t forget to give them your booth number (and maybe even a map notating your booth) so they know exactly where to find you come showtime!

2. SEND PERSONAL EMAILS

Yes, take the time to PERSONALLY reach out to your top clients and prospects. Start with something personal so they know you aren’t sending a blast email or just copying and pasting. ie: Hi Jim! I hope you are enjoying this great golfing weather! How’s your son’s soccer team doing?

Next, let them know about your upcoming exhibit and you’d love to block off time to meet with either on the show floor or after show hours. (If you aren’t working the show, make sure you still invite them to stop by the booth and see your colleagues.)

3. PICK UP THE PHONE

Make the calls, keep calling and call again. You want to be busy at the show with the right kind of meetings so set them up in advance. Keep calling until you get your day(s) at the show filled with back-to-back appointments. It’s better for them to book appointments with you, rather than with your competitor.

Read next week’s blog for part 2 where I give you insight on the role of sales during the show!

DEB VENABLE
Executive Coach

Deb Venable has over 25 years of experience in the tradeshow industry. As a seasoned entrepreneur and business owner, Deb understands first-hand the struggles and obstacles of growing a business and exhibiting.  A leader in sales strategy and coaching, Deb’s passion for people and progress help her work with business owners to generate significant, predictable & sustainable growth year after year.

MYB2BCOACH is designed to leverage the combined knowledge of your business leadership and transform it into practical skills that become second nature to your sales team. Our proven process is built on strategy, training, accountability, and A.I. sales coaching software. Your sales team will become confident, comfortable and conversational in their prospecting and closing, leading to new clients, improved profits, increased commissions, and job satisfaction.

error: